Hiccup, brain freeze, sneezing... Why do we have these bodily reflexes?

Why do we have these reflexes?
Why do we get brain freeze?
When our sinuses cool too quickly
Why do we feel tingling in the legs?
Our brain gets confused
Why do we yawn?
Yawning sends oxygen to the brain
Why do we get teary-eyed without crying?
For our eyes' protection
Why do we get the shivers?
Contraction of the muscles
Why do we get goosebumps?
Goosebumps or shivers from emotion
Why do we have muscle spasms?
Falling into deep sleep too fast
What's the function of our eyes blinking?
At times, we blink nearly once per second!
Why do we have hiccups?
Digestive, respiratory and psychological causes
What's the use of sneezing?
Reaction to bright light
Why do we have these reflexes?

Whether they are involuntary, automatic, or unconscious, reflexes allow us to protect ourselves from dangers. But what are our most common reflexes?

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Why do we get brain freeze?

Many of us have suffered this terrible headache after eating very cold ice cream. It feels like our brain has frozen for a little while.

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When our sinuses cool too quickly

In reality, this pain is caused by the blood capillaries in the sinuses cooling too quickly. The brain immediately activates pain neurotransmitters and we suffer while the sinuses return to their normal temperature.

Why do we feel tingling in the legs?

When we adopt a posture that hinders the proper circulation of blood, the brain reacts by sending a nerve signal that is numbness.

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Our brain gets confused

Once we've changed position and circulation is restored, the brain receives contradictory information that we know as 'tingling.'

Why do we yawn?

Yawning is one of the most common behaviors of living things. It has been the subject of many studies, yet it remains shrouded in mystery.

 

Yawning sends oxygen to the brain

Some associate it with the sleep cycle, others consider it a sign of boredom. Among the researchers who have studied the subject, some think that it is a big puff of oxygen sent to the brain to stimulate it.

Why do we get teary-eyed without crying?

Sometimes tears flow without us being sad. They are like 'automatic tears.'

 

For our eyes' protection

Caused by irritation, fatigue, or bright light, they are the result of an instinctive discharge of the lacrimal glands which release their overflow.

Why do we get the shivers?

In principle, shivers are associated with hypothermia. Some people also shiver with emotion, such as fear or pleasure.

Contraction of the muscles

In reality, all these feelings and experiences have the same effect on our body: the muscles contract very quickly (about ten contractions per second) to warm up the body.

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Why do we get goosebumps?

This reflex is linked to feeling chilly. By contracting, the muscles at the base of the hairs cause goosebumps. The function of this reflex is to lift the hairs and thus forming a layer of insulation between the body and the outside.

Goosebumps or shivers from emotion

Of course, some of us also get goosebumps from sudden emotions. It works very similarly to the reflex of the shivers.

Why do we have muscle spasms?

Muscle spasms are involuntary and uncontrollable muscle contractions. Sometimes it happens right when we are falling asleep.

Falling into deep sleep too fast

According to researchers, this is a reflex due to the fact of having fallen into REM sleep without going through the preliminary stages.

What's the function of our eyes blinking?

The eye blinks when it dries up. By lowering, the eyelid moistens the eyeball, which avoids an unpleasant sensation of dryness for us. Blinking also serves to clean the dust that settles on the membrane.

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At times, we blink nearly once per second!

On average, the eye blinks from 7.5 times to 50 times per minute, depending on the activity we are doing.

Why do we have hiccups?

Hiccups are caused by the irritation of the diaphragm. This, in turn, is caused by a combination of digestive, respiratory, and psychological factors.

 

Digestive, respiratory and psychological causes

An involuntary reflex, a hiccup signals a transient problem to expel air. It can often happen after a good meal when the stomach is full.

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What's the use of sneezing?

The sneeze has the obvious objective of clearing any impurities from the nose. However, some people sneeze when they see a bright light. This is called the 'photic-sneeze reflex.'

 

Reaction to bright light

The photic-sneeze reflex (PSR) is caused by a benign congenital anomaly that affects certain nerve signals. While researchers don't know all the details of the mechanism, they agree that it's nothing serious - just a little annoying for those who often have to deal with it.

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