Flip flops and bikinis? Careful going on holiday, these items are prohibited in some countries

Be careful this summer not to get fined
Sorrento, Italy: bikinis
Rome, Italy: singing
Hawaii: singing loudly after sunset
Spain: smoking
Malaysia: shoes (inside)
Tunisia: presents for mum
Jale Beach, Albania: children
Valencia: loud music
Spain: shampoo and soap (on the beach!)
South Africa: standing too close
Croatia: benched
Indonesia: forgetting to flush
Denmark: not checking if you are about to run over a kid
Sardinia, Italy: bringing the beach home
Singapore: chewing gum
Barcelona & Mallorca, Spain: bikinis
Greece: high heels
Mallorca: happy hour
Capri, Italy: noisy footwear (especially flip flops)
Hawaii: certain types of sunscreen
Turin, Italy: not walking your dog enough
Rome, Italy: lingering on the Spanish Steps
Be careful this summer not to get fined

Going on holiday? Don’t get a fine and read the list of no-no items in some holiday destinations. From banning bikinis and suncream to taking a nap on a bench; the world's tourist destinations give us some weird (and some worthwhile!) laws.

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Sorrento, Italy: bikinis

Sorrento is one of Italy's most popular tourist destinations. But take care walking around in your swimwear. The Mayor announced there would be a fine of up to €500 ($510) should you walk around the town - into a cafe or shops - in your bikini. The ban is already in place in northern Italy, too, as well as in many parts of Spain.

Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash

Rome, Italy: singing

Keep it down in public. Singing on the city’s buses, metro and trams is a big no in this historic city. If you’re not sure what to do, follow the old saying: when in Rome, do as the Romans do. Also, a note to fans of 'La Dolce Vita:' Please do not dance in the Trevi Fountain.

Hawaii: singing loudly after sunset

Hawaii made it illegal to sing loudly after sunset. They also became the first state to make it illegal to text or look down at your phone while crossing the street — even in a marked crosswalk.

Spain: smoking

Anyone who has traveled to Spain knows that this country is a fan of tobacco; just not on the beach. A new law was passed in Spain last year that gives local municipalities the power to fine anyone caught smoking on the beach.

Malaysia: shoes (inside)

A big NO in any Malaysian household and considered the height of rudeness: tracking in the dirt on nice clean floors. If you’ve booked an Airbnb, check with the owner whether this is a point of contention with them. Also, no kissing in public. Malaysia’s highest court has ruled that couples who indulge in public displays of affection such as hugging and kissing can face imprisonment and serious fines.

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Tunisia: presents for mum

Tunisia has become a breeding ground for artifact smuggling. The government has subsequently made it illegal to take antiques out of the country without declaring them at customs. So before you buy something at a market or shop, make sure you have the proper documentation needed to bring these items home. The last thing you need is to be at customs for hours.

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Jale Beach, Albania: children

One might think that the beach is the perfect day out for the kids, but not on this beach in Albania. One TripAdvisor reviewer of the area in 2016 wrote, 'We were just kicked off from there because no children allowed... Interesting with absolutely no explanations. Never coming back.'

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Valencia: loud music

Valencia, although popular for its nightlife, has taken a step to keep noise pollution down on the beaches. The use of loud speakers by bathers is strictly prohibited. Stick to the paella.

Spain: shampoo and soap (on the beach!)

You could get a fine of up to 750 euros ($765) should you think washing your hair in the beach showers is a good idea. It's not. The laws are in place to protect marine life and should be adhered to all over the world.

South Africa: standing too close

South Africa has some of the world's most beautiful beaches in the world, but you'll have to follow some strict rules if you plan to visit. One law requires young people in bathing suits to sit at least 12 inches apart from each other.

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Croatia: benched

In Croatia, you can be ticketed and fined for sleeping on a public bench. The fine doubles if you're heard snoring as you dream.

Photo by Yehor Tulinov on Unsplash

Indonesia: forgetting to flush

Take care if you use a public restroom in Indonesia, a country with an extremely strict criminal justice system. It's illegal not to flush the toilet after using it, and police do random inspections of public bathrooms. Fairly obvious, I hear you cry, but wait: many toilets do not include a traditional flush system and need to be flushed manually with a bucket of water.

Denmark: not checking if you are about to run over a kid

Before starting their cars, drivers are required to test their lights and brakes, honk their horns, and check for children under their vehicles. Those pesky kids get everywhere.

Sardinia, Italy: bringing the beach home

It’s illegal to take sand and shells from Sardinia’s beaches. A number of tourists have been fined for the beach-based crime, including a French man who had to pay €1,000 ($1,020) after trying to fly off the island with more than four pounds of sand in his suitcase.

Singapore: chewing gum

Singapore is famous for its beautifully maintained public areas, in part due to severe laws against litter and graffiti. It's been illegal to chew gum in Singapore since 1992.

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Barcelona & Mallorca, Spain: bikinis

Nobody wants to see it: Bikinis in the street and men without shirts. You can be fined for walking from car to beach if not fully dressed. All that work in the gym and you can’t even show off your pecs.

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Greece: high heels

High heels are prohibited at several ancient sites in Greece. The ban came into effect in 2009 after the Culture Ministry announced that "female visitors must wear shoes that do not damage the monuments."

Photo by Patrick on Unsplash

Mallorca: happy hour

Trying to avoid the drink-fuelled tourists that often make up a large percent of the island's tourism, the Balearics finally decided to ban happy hour promotions and organized bar crawls. On top of that, shops selling alcohol must close between 8.30 pm and 7 am.

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Capri, Italy: noisy footwear (especially flip flops)

Widely noted as one of the world's strangest laws, it's illegal in Capri to wear excessively noisy footwear (in particular flip flops) as the locals value their 'peace and quiet.' The law has been enforced: a couple was arrested while holidaying there for doing exactly this!

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Hawaii: certain types of sunscreen

Hawaii has become the first place in the world to ban "the sale, offer of sale, and distribution of sunscreens that contain the chemicals oxybenzone and octinoxate." Studies showed that those two chemicals cause genetic damage to marine life, including coral reefs. This is definitely a ban that should be more widespread.

Turin, Italy: not walking your dog enough

Going on holiday with your dog? "In Turin, it will be illegal to turn one's dog into a ridiculous fluffy toy," the city's 'La Stampa' reported when it became illegal not to walk your dog at least three times a day. Dog owners in Turin will be fined up to 500 euros ($510) for disobeying.

Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Unsplash

Rome, Italy: lingering on the Spanish Steps

In 2019, it became illegal to linger on the iconic Spanish Steps in the streets of Rome. The rule stated that people caught sitting, eating, or drinking on the steps can face fines of up to €400 ($410). The steps underwent a €1.5m restoration in 2016 by luxury fashion brand, Bulgari.

Photo by Sirus Azadi on Unsplash

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