Forbidden! From blue jeans to Winnie the Pooh...these prohibitions are just odd

Winnie the Pooh
The Polish want Winnie the Pooh to wear pants
Running out of fuel
Running out of fuel in Germany could cause the withdrawal of your licence
Dancing after midnight
Dancing into the early hours allowed since 2016
Wearing yellow
Forbidden since 2015
Blue jeans
A symbol of American imperialism?
Chewing gum
If you want to chew gum in Singapore you'll need a prescription
Choosing a first name
Special government permission is needed for names that are not on the list
Dancing in public
Many teenagers have been arrested for public dancing
Outdoor sports
Even jogging can get you in trouble
Mowing the lawn
Good neighbours don't make lots of noise on a Sunday
Cotton buds
One of the most common products polluting the seas
Camouflage prints
Only to be worn by members of the military
Scrabble
Scrabble in now legal in Romania
Video games
By 2011 video games were legal again
Valentine's Day
A Valentine's Day black market
Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh is banned in China. His supposed resemblance to Xi Jinping amuses Chinese internet users and angers the country's leader.

The Polish want Winnie the Pooh to wear pants

His depiction is also forbidden near children in Poland, because the bear doesn't wear any pants and that's scandalous.

Running out of fuel

It is forbidden to run out of gas on Germany's roads. The local government argues that anyone entering its highways should be able to know when to tank for gas.

Running out of fuel in Germany could cause the withdrawal of your licence

It is considered reckless endangerment to walk to a gas station and leave your car on the side of the road after running out of fuel. A serious offense, it can lead to steep fines and the withdrawal of your driving licence for six months.

Dancing after midnight

In 1948, to prevent prostitution and criminal confrontations, Japan banned dancing in clubs after midnight.

Dancing into the early hours allowed since 2016

The measure remained in force until 2016, but in its last years it was not enforced as it had been before.

Wearing yellow

If yellow is your favourite colour, you better think twice before moving to Malaysia...because it is forbidden to wear yellow clothes there!

Forbidden since 2015

The measure came into force in 2015 after a group of opposition activists chose to wear this colour in their protests.

Blue jeans

If you are a fashion lover, another country that would be hard to live in is North Korea.  It is forbidden to wear blue jeans in the country!

A symbol of American imperialism?

Why is one of the most popular items of clothing forbidden? The regime considers them a symbol of US imperialism. Luckily, other colours of jeans are accepted.

Chewing gum

Since 1992, the sale and import of chewing gums has been banned in Singapore.

If you want to chew gum in Singapore you'll need a prescription

The cost of cleaning public transport facilities is considered too high for the local government. However, in 2004, the import of gum became legal with a medical prescription.

Choosing a first name

In Denmark, parents must choose their children's first name from the 7,000 that form part of an official state list.

Special government permission is needed for names that are not on the list

If they refuse and prefer a different name, they must obtain permission from the government.

Dancing in public

In Iran, dancing in public has been forbidden since the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Many teenagers have been arrested for public dancing

In recent years, many teenagers have been arrested and given prison sentences for not complying with the measure.

Outdoor sports

In 2014, the city of Bujumbura in Burundi banned team sports to prevent political protests.

Even jogging can get you in trouble

This measure came after clashes between police and opposition activists who dressed up as joggers in the city. Besides group activities, going jogging can also be interpreted as a subversive act against the government.

Mowing the lawn

In Switzerland, it is forbidden to mow the lawn on Sundays.

Good neighbours don't make lots of noise on a Sunday

It's a measure designed to encourage good neighbourly relations.

Cotton buds

In 2020, cotton buds with plastic stems will no longer be sold in France.

One of the most common products polluting the seas

This measure follows a long-standing demand by several NGOs, as the product is one of the most common products polluting aquatic environments.

Camouflage prints

In the fall of 2020, people were wearing camo everywhere...well ALMOST everywhere.....

Only to be worn by members of the military

In the Caribbean islands of Antigua, Barbados, Barbuda, Jamaica, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent it is forbidden for the average person to wear camouflage print clothing. It is only permitted if you are in the army.

Scrabble

In the 1980s, Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu banned this board game because he considered it a "subversive evil."

Scrabble in now legal in Romania

By now, Scrabble is legal again in the European country, and there's even a national association for Scrabble players that organizes tournaments.

Video games

In 2002, the Greek government banned all video games. Its intention was to combat illegal gambling.

By 2011 video games were legal again

But the drafting of this law was so ambiguous that all games were banned. In 2011, the government repealed the ban under the pressure from the European Commission.

Valentine's Day

In Saudi Arabia, religious police strictly prohibited the celebration of Valentine's Day until 2016.

A Valentine's Day black market

The censors even monitored florists and confectioners on the date. In the meantime, a black market of Valentine's items sprung up, giving way to a widespread public celebration in the years after 2016.

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