This is what Malala Yousafzai, the world’s youngest Nobel laureate, has been up to

Happily married
Marriage isn't slowing her down
In Qatar
The Doha Forum
Speaking her mind
Burka or bikini?
Hanging out with friends
Bestie
Malala gets married
A man behind a great woman
Nobel Peace Prize winner at 17
Life under the Taliban
International attention
One busy year
Nobel against extremism
The Malala Fund
Education first
 Philosophy, Politics and Economics
A late graduation
Books, not bullets
UN ambassador for Peace
Standing with Afghan girls
Personal life
Nobel laureate and cricket fan
Return to Pakistan?
Happily married

Last November, human rights activist Malala Yousafzai announced to the world her marriage to the Pakistani cricket businessman Asser Malik. What has been the life of the youngest Nobel Prize winner since then? Where's Malala now?

Marriage isn't slowing her down

Despite being a newlywed, Malala kept her social and professional responsibilities expected from such an important personality. Here she can be seen attending a social function for The Malala Fund in London, days later after her wedding.

In Qatar

The young activist also participated in the Doha Forum in Qatar in March 2022 where she spoke about the importance of female education.

The Doha Forum

Al Jazeera describes The Doha Forum as “the biggest global platform that brings together policy leaders to discuss critical challenges facing the world, promote the interchange of ideas, and action-oriented recommendations”.

Speaking her mind

Also in March 2022, Malala addressed the controversy over Muslim women's choice to wear a burka.

Burka or bikini?

“Whether a woman chooses a burka or a bikini, she has the right to decide for herself. Come and talk to us about individual freedom and autonomy, about preventing harm and violence, about education and emancipation”, Yousafzai wrote in an essay.

 

Hanging out with friends

Nonetheless, the young activist still finds free time to enjoy her life. Here she is with her friend, Pakistani filmmaker Sarah Jehaan Khan in March 2022.

Bestie

And here's she in April with Zimbabwean education activist Kativhu.

Malala gets married

Malala announced her married to Asser Malik on November 10, 2021. The young activist wrote on social media that this moment “marks a precious day in my life.”

A man behind a great woman

Asser Malik is a Pakistani businessman who serves as the High-Performance general manager of the Pakistan Cricket Board. Yousafzai has expressed many times her love for the game.

Nobel Peace Prize winner at 17

It's been quite a journey for Malala Yousafzai in such a short time. After all, the advocate for the rights of women and youth earned her the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, at age 17.

Life under the Taliban

Malala Yousafzai was born in Mingora, a city in the northwestern Pakistani province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. At age 12, she began writing a blog about her life in a region occupied by the Taliban for the BBC.

Pictured: Malala Yousafzai at age 12, in 2009.

International attention

Soon she garnered attention worldwide, though not always positive. Malala suffered an assassination attempt in 2012, when she was 15. The attack, perpetrated by members of an extremist Muslim group, was roundly condemned around the world. Yousafzai had to go through extensive reconstructive surgery.

One busy year

2013 was an important year for the young activist. She spoke at the United Nations, had a private audience with Queen Elizabeth, and met with US President Barack Obama and his family. Malala criticized the Obama administration's approval of drone strikes in Pakistan.

Nobel against extremism

Malala became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize in 2014, at age 17. She shared the award with Indian social reformer Kailash Satyarthi. The committee declared that they picked an Indian and a Muslim winner to portray “a common struggle for education and against extremism.”

The Malala Fund

The young activist launched in 2013 the non-profit organization The Malala Fund. This foundation, which aims to educate and empower girls in developing countries, carries Malala's work while she can focus on other matters.

Education first

Yousafzai is well-known for regarding education as a top priority. From 2013 to 2017 she was a pupil at the all-girl Edgbaston High School in Birmingham, England. She has been focusing much more on her future and her education these past years.

Philosophy, Politics and Economics

After Edgbaston, Malala was accepted into Lady Margaret Hall College at the University of Oxford. She graduated with a degree in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics with the highest honors in June 2020.

A late graduation

However, it was only in November 2021 that the young activist actually got her degree from Oxford.

Pictured: Malala and US Secretary of State Antony Blinken in late 2021.

Books, not bullets

Malala continued to do some interviews and public appearances along with her studies. On her 18th birthday, in 2015, she opened a school for Syrian refugees in Lebanon and called world leaders to invest in “books, not bullets.”

(Photo: United Nations)

UN ambassador for Peace

Malala became a United Nations Ambassador for Peace in April 2017, the youngest person to have that honor.

(Photo: United Nations)

Standing with Afghan girls

She was also in Afghanistan in 2021 during the retreat of US troops and joined other activists to demand that the Taliban respect the rights of women and girls.

(Photo: United Nations)

Personal life

However, Yousafzai also has a lively personal life and can be seen in some social events. Pictured here is Malala attending a private party organized by British Vogue in September 2021 to celebrate fashion in film.

Nobel laureate and cricket fan

She was also part of the ICC Cricket World Cup opening party in London in 2019. Cricket is probably the most popular sport in Pakistan.

Return to Pakistan?

Malala has mentioned her wish to return to Pakistan “without any fear”. “I am proud of my religion, and I am proud of my country,” she declared in a statement picked by The Daily Telegraph. Hopefully, that day will arrive sooner than later for the young activist.

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