Student mental health needs to be addressed - it may be key to prevent school shootings

Signs of potential violence can be identified
Uvalde’s gunman had mental health issues
A pattern of violence and poor mental health among shooters
Shooters also displayed interest in guns and mass shootings
Signs of distress before the shooting
Threats on social media close US schools almost every day
Taking their own lives
Suspension of an aggressive students may worsen the situation
Trump’s futile response to school shootings
91% of shooters were students or former students at the targeted school
Recognising and acting upon warning
Mental health assessments through screening
How screening works
Prioritise students with poor mental health
Other ways of identifying potential shooters
Each day, dozens of calls come into the program’s dispatch center
The experts then evaluate the student
Hiring more mental health experts in schools
Training teachers
Teaching social and emotional skills from a young age
These skills help kids identify violence
Shift the focus from protection to prevention
Signs of potential violence can be identified

Whenever a school shooting takes place in the US, like the latest one at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, discussions often follow about whether school officials may have missed any “red flags.” Experts and data show that school shooters almost always give signs before they open fire.

 

Uvalde’s gunman had mental health issues

The gunman in Uvalde’s elementary school massacre was a lonely 18-year-old who was bullied at school, had a disruptive family life and was suicidal, according to testimonies of people who were close to him, given to The Washington Post.

A pattern of violence and poor mental health among shooters

In fact, a mass shooter database created by experts for the National Institute of Justice, found that, since 1966, all school shooters had a large number of risk factors for violence. 45% had witnessed or experienced childhood trauma and 77% had mental health issues.

Shooters also displayed interest in guns and mass shootings

The same database found that 75% of school shooters had an interest in past shootings, as evidenced in their writing, social media posts or other activities.

Signs of distress before the shooting

A majority of mass school shooters (87%) showed signs of a crisis, as exhibited in their behaviour before the shooting. 78% revealed their plans ahead of time, often on social media. When younger, they also used guns that they stole from parents and other significant adults in their lives, according to the database.

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Threats on social media close US schools almost every day

Social media threats are forcing administrators to close schools or entire districts, impose lockdowns, or evacuate buildings while police investigate almost every day, according to the Disctrict Administration.

Image: Ivan Aleksic/Unsplash

Taking their own lives

The same analysis found that about 80% of mass school shooters thought about taking their own lives. Almost all of them died at the scene of the shooting, often by their own hand. According to the database, 52% of mass school shooters killed themselves, while 15% were killed by police and 30% were apprehended.

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Suspension of an aggressive students may worsen the situation

Punishing explicit threats of violence with suspension, expulsion or criminal charges is ineffective with students who want to end their lives, according to ScienceDirect. These methods only increase the risk for violence and worsen grievances with the school.

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Trump’s futile response to school shootings

Likewise, when a would-be shooter already desires to die, the death penalty (President Trump’s proposed response to mass shootings) is pointless.

 

91% of shooters were students or former students at the targeted school

This is why drills are inadequate, according to experts. “If the shooter is a student in the school, this only shows potential perpetrators the school’s planned response, which can be used to increase casualties”, say Jillian Peterson and James Densley, Professors of Criminal Justice, in The Conversation.

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Recognising and acting upon warning

Because educators observe students’ emotional and behavioral development daily, they are best positioned to detect troubled behaviors and intervene, says Elizabeth Englander, Professor of Psychology, in The Conversation.

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Mental health assessments through screening

Screeners are brief assessments that take no more than a few minutes to complete. They include approximately 20 questions and are given to each student in the elementary classroom.

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How screening works

These tools ask students to indicate things such as “I lose my temper” or whether they are “adaptable to change.” The questions are purposefully broad and are meant to identify students who may be at risk for either internal problem behaviors, such as depression, or external problem behaviors, such as aggression toward others.

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Prioritise students with poor mental health

The screenings are scored and used to prioritize which students need intervention, says Nathaniel von der Embse, creator of the Social, Academic and Emotional Behavior Risk Screener, to The Conversation.

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Other ways of identifying potential shooters

A program in Los Angeles, financed under California’s Mental Health Services Act, is noteworthy for the sharing of information among agencies and for the degree of follow-up in keeping track of worrisome students over time, according to the New York Times.

 

Each day, dozens of calls come into the program’s dispatch center

From principals, counselors, school security officers or parents worried about students who have talked about suicide, exhibited bizarre behavior or made outright threats.

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The experts then evaluate the student

They go to the school, evaluate them there, then go to the child’s home and ask to see the bedroom and do a data-driven assessment. Experts involved in the program said that in more than a few cases, the approach had been successful in heading off violence.

 

Hiring more mental health experts in schools

Due to budget cuts, many schools have few or no trained school psychologists, social workers or adjustment counselors on staff, according to the American Counselling Association.

 

Training teachers

All school personnel (teachers, administrators and staff members) should be able to recognize signs of a student in crisis, according to experts. They need to be trained in crisis intervention, de-escalation, self-harm prevention, and be educated on how to connect students to needed help.

Image: Jason Goodman/Unsplash

 

Teaching social and emotional skills from a young age

Children learn social skills from everyday interactions with each other. Playtime teaches young people how to control their emotions, recognize others’ feelings and to negotiate, according to Parenting Science.

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These skills help kids identify violence

Students with more fluent social skills connect better with others and may be able to recognize troubled peers who need help, according to Joseph E. Zins, author of ‘Building Academic Success on Social and Emotional Learning.’

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Shift the focus from protection to prevention

Research suggests that it is time to shift the focus from protection to prevention and from physical security to mental well-being.

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