Russia's top diplomat: The Kremlin seeks regime change in Ukraine

Regime change
Liberating Ukraine, whether they like it or not
War as a contradiction
'anti-popular and anti-historic regime'
Who are you going to believe?
Kyiv reactions
'Schizophrenic'
'Regimes are something we find in Russian prisons'
Safe passage for Odesa
Food, glorious food
No ceasefire
'Considerable distance'
Not our problem
Agreements
Beyond the Donbas
Not exactly scout's honor
Regime change

Al Jazeera reported on July 23 that Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov declared that it was within the Kremlin’s objectives to overthrow the Ukrainian government.

Liberating Ukraine, whether they like it or not

Lavrov claimed that Russia was determined to help Ukrainians “liberate themselves from the burden of this absolutely unacceptable regime”.

War as a contradiction

These comments contradict earlier statements by the Russian government, claiming that the invasion of Ukraine was simply a special military operation to protect the people of Donetsk and Luhansk and “denazify” the country.

'anti-popular and anti-historic regime'

“The Russian and Ukrainian peoples will continue to live together. We will help the Ukrainian people get rid of the absolutely anti-popular and anti-historic regime”, Lavrov pledged, during a diplomatic visit to Cairo.

Who are you going to believe?

“We are sorry for those who have yielded to the Kyiv regime’s state propaganda and for those who support this regime, which wants Ukraine to be Russia’s eternal enemy”, The Russian Foreign Minister stated.

Kyiv reactions

News website Ukrainska Pravda highlights the response of Mykhailo Podoliak, an advisor from the Office of the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky. Podoliak decried the Russian Foreign Minister’s statements as “schizophrenic”.

'Schizophrenic'

“In the morning, you declare that Moscow wants negotiations, and in the evening, you claim that your goal is to get rid of the ‘anti-popular Kyiv regime’”, the presidential advisor pointed out.

'Regimes are something we find in Russian prisons'

“‘Regimes’ are something we find in Russian prisons, while in Ukraine there is a legally elected government that won in fair, competitive, democratic elections. So many words unfamiliar to the Russian elite in one sentence”, Podoliak joked.

Safe passage for Odesa

Moscow and Kyiv had recently reached an agreement to guarantee the safe passage of Ukrainian grain exports through Odesa and other important ports in the Black Sea.

Food, glorious food

Ukraine is an agricultural powerhouse and its grain exports, disrupted because of the Russian invasion, would seek to alleviate the growing global food crisis that is looming over Europe and the Arab world.

No ceasefire

However, the Washington Post highlighted that, at the same time, Russia continued attacking the port of Odesa with missiles just a few days later.

'Considerable distance'

Lavrov claimed that the missile strike targeted “the military part of the port” and at a “considerable distance” from the grain exports, per quotes picked by DW.

Not our problem

“There is nothing in the obligations that Russia took on that would forbid us from continuing the special military operation”, the Kremlin’s top diplomat declared.

Agreements

“Our position is very simple. We signed an agreement with the UN and Turkey. If the sides guarantee security, the agreement will work. If they do not, it will not work”, said Ukraine's Infrastructure Minister Oleksandr Kubrakov.

Beyond the Donbas

The Washington Port reports that the week before, Lavrov had mentioned that Russia intends to extend its control beyond the Donbas region, specifically the southern oblasts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia. This would effectively create a corridor connecting Russia to Crimea.

Not exactly scout's honor

Many experts wonder if Russia cannot keep its word with the port of Odesa, how likely is it that the Kremlin would respect a peace agreement?

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