Breaking news
Kremlin Propaganda
'No war'
The blue and the yellow
Anarchists Vs. Oligarchs
Russians against war
'Enemy' at the gates
'Two words'
The Irony of Fate?
Nothing to add
'Putin, go away'
From St. Petersburg to Siberia
Busy weekend
Counterprotests
Politsiya
Detentions
Elena Osipova
Using the pandemic as an excuse
Checkpoints
Don't mention the war
Off the air
What's Russian for 'fake news'?
Radio silence
Military censorship
Navalny speaks out
'It was Putin, not Russia'
People aren't their government
Will history absolve Russia?
Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
(1/28)
Breaking news

Marina Ovsyannikova, an editor of Russia's Channel One, broke into the March 14th broadcast of the evening news with a sign that read: “Don’t believe the propaganda. They’re lying to you here.”

Image: Channel One

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Kremlin Propaganda

The Guardian reports that Ovsyannikova also released a pre-recorded video where she states her embarrassment for working making 'Kremlin propaganda' for years. The video was made public through the OVD-Info human rights group.

Image: OVD-Info

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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'No war'

“What is happening in Ukraine is a crime and Russia is the aggressor,” she said, per The Guardian. “The responsibility of this aggression lies on the shoulders of only one person: Vladimir Putin”.

Pictured: Graffiti on a Moscow street with the message 'No war'.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
(4/28)
The blue and the yellow

People from all over the world have come out to protest Vladimir Putin’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine and show solidarity with the Ukrainian people. In Paris, the Monument à la République has recently been draped in the Ukrainian blue and yellow.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Anarchists Vs. Oligarchs

While in London, squatters have taken over the empty houses of some Russian oligarchs with the intention of serving as a home for Ukrainian refugees.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Russians against war

To the surprise of many, public demonstrations have also been taking place inside Russia, despite government repression.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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'Enemy' at the gates

Some of the most recent protests, called by jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny, have even dared to stand in front of the gates of the Kremlin.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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'Two words'

In a video that has gone viral on social media and that has been shared by news outlets like The Huffington Post, a woman holding a small sign that simply says 'two words' is arrested outside the Kremlin.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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The Irony of Fate?

A few seconds later, another woman steps in to defend Russia's military intervention of Ukraine… only to be arrested too.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Nothing to add

In another video, shared by Russian news outlet Meduza, a person in Nizhny Novgorod is seen detained just for holding a blank sign.

Image: Meduza

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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'Putin, go away'

Independent human rights monitoring group OVD-Info reports that around 15,000 people have been arrested across Russia for opposing the war in Ukraine.

Pictured: A person in Moscow with a sign that says “No war. Putin, go away”

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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From St. Petersburg to Siberia

These protests have gone from major cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg to smaller, remote populations in faraway places such as Siberia.

Here you can see a man being detained in Voronezh, near the border with Ukraine, in a rally against the war.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Busy weekend

Russia’s Minister of Internal Affairs, as quoted by Al Jazeera, declared that the police had detained 3,500 people during one weekend alone.

Pictured: A member of the security forces detains a man in St. Petersburg

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Counterprotests

In some cases, these anti-war rallies were countered by pro-government pro-war nationalist demonstrations.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Politsiya

The protests have been dispersed by the police for the most part. The Russian Minister of Internal Affairs threatened that anyone attempting to hold illegal demonstrations would face consequences, according to The Guardian.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Detentions

Reuters says that people have been detained in at least 56 cities.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Elena Osipova

Among those arrested was Holocaust survivor Elena Osipova, seen here taken away by two police officers in St. Petersburg.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Using the pandemic as an excuse

Among other excuses used by security forces is that these demonstrations were breaking Covid-19 regulations.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Checkpoints

The Russian police even have established checkpoints in several urban centers, revising people’s phones.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
(20/28)
Don't mention the war

The government has also cracked down on independent news outlets for referring to Russia’s actions in Ukraine as “war”.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Off the air

The radio station Echo of Moscow and the independent television channel Dozhd were taken off the air due to their coverage of the war in Ukraine.

Pictured: The offices of the Echo of Moscow.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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What's Russian for 'fake news'?

Some journalists could face sentences of up to 15 years under charges of spreading false information under a recently approved law.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Radio silence

Meanwhile, BBC, CNN, Bloomberg, and other major news outlets are calling back their correspondents, arguing that their journalists can no longer report news safely and freely from Russia.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Military censorship

“The screws are being fully tightened. Essentially we are witnessing military censorship,” Maria Kuznetsova, a spokeswoman from OVD-Info, declared to Reuters.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Navalny speaks out

The jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was quoted by The Guardian, pointing out that Putin’s actions do not reflect on how the average person feels about Ukraine.

Pictured: Navalny during his arrest in January 2021.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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'It was Putin, not Russia'

“Because of Putin, Russia now means war for many people,” Navalny declared. “That is not right: it was Putin and not Russia that attacked Ukraine.”

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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People aren't their government

“Whether Russians actually support the hideous war that Putin has waged against Ukraine is a matter of utmost political importance,” writes Navalny on social media.

Russians continue to protest the war, despite Putin's oppression
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Will history absolve Russia?

“The answer to this question will largely define Russia’s place in the history of the 21st century”.

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