The Jan. 6 Committee Hearings are over, what happens next?

Minute-by-minute accountings
A nonchalant Trump watching T.V.
The tweet that made things escalate
The breaking point
Trump’s tweet gave the green light to rioters
White House resignations
Security agents feared for their lives
Some said their goodbyes to family members
Senator Hawley's fist pump in support of Capitol rioters
Hawley denies he sympathizes with Capitol rioters
Trump Didn’t Want to Say the Election Was Over
Aides were angry over Trump’s failure to acknowledge an officer’s death
Text exchange
Trump wouldn’t condemn the riot
Trump’s response to the hearing
Wrap up
Laws are just words on paper
A supreme violation to the oath of office
The case against Trump is made by his own supporters
What’s next?
After the panel returns in September
Minute-by-minute accountings

Thursday's congressional committee hearing on the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot by supporters of Donald Trump featured a minute-by-minute account of the former president's actions, and inaction, as his supporters launched a violent attack.

A nonchalant Trump watching T.V.

In more than two hours of recorded and live testimony, the committee portrayed a president sitting idly by, watching the events on television. Meanwhile, aides, family members, and security officials grew increasingly fearful and pleaded for him to take action to quell the violence.

The tweet that made things escalate

Witnesses testified that Trump did nothing to call off the riot when it started. Aides said he then fanned the flames with a tweet. At 2:24 p.m., after the riot was underway, he tweeted: “Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done”, referring to the vice president’s refusal to block the certification of President Biden’s election win.

The breaking point

White House officials described the tweet as a breaking point that prompted some to decide to resign. “The tweet looked to me like the opposite of what we really needed at that moment, which was a de-escalation,” Matt Pottinger, Mr. Trump’s former deputy national security adviser, told the committee.

Trump’s tweet gave the green light to rioters

Sarah Matthews, a former White House deputy press secretary, argued that the tweet gave Mr. Trump’s supporters permission to continue their assault on the U.S. Capitol. “It was essentially him giving the green light to these people,” she said.

White House resignations

Both Matt Pottinger and Sarah Mathews said the tweet prompted them to decide to step down. White House top lawyer Pat Cipollone (in the picture) said he thought about resigning, but was worried about who would replace him.

Security agents feared for their lives

An unnamed White House security official described harrowing radio messages from Vice President Mike Pence’s security detail, asserting that some members feared for their own lives as the mob entered the Capitol.

Some said their goodbyes to family members

The official said the agents came very close to having to use lethal force “or worse” and added that some called in to say goodbye to their family members.

Senator Hawley's fist pump in support of Capitol rioters

The committee showed security footage of Senator Josh Hawley running down the halls of the Capitol in an apparent attempt to escape the rioters. They contrasted it with the now widely seen photograph of Hawley raising his fist in solidarity with Trump supporters.

Hawley denies he sympathizes with Capitol rioters

Hawley has repeatedly said he doesn't sympathize with the crowd that overran the Capitol, although he has used the image of his fist-pump for his political advantage.

Trump Didn’t Want to Say the Election Was Over

The committee played outtakes from videotaped remarks by Trump on Jan. 7 about the riot at the U.S. Capitol, in which he appears to be reluctant to say that the election is over. “I don’t want to say the election is over,” Trump says in the video. “I just want to say Congress has certified the results without saying the election is over, okay?”

Aides were angry over Trump’s failure to acknowledge an officer’s death

The committee showed texts showing frustration between Trump campaign aides over news that Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick had died a day after confronting rioters at the Capitol.

Text exchange

Trump campaign spokesman Tim Murtaugh complained about the lack of acknowledgment of the death of the Capitol police officer. Matthew Wolking, the deputy director of communications for the Trump campaign, replied, “That is enraging to me. Everything he said about supporting law enforcement was a lie.”

Trump wouldn’t condemn the riot

Murtaugh responded: “You know what that is, of course, if he acknowledged the dead cop, he’d be implicitly faulting the mob. And he won’t do that, because they're his people.”

Trump’s response to the hearing

In a series of messages on his Truth Social service after the hearing, Trump challenged the testimony. He said the committee presented “so many lies and misrepresentations” and has called the committee a “sham.”

Wrap up

The committee wrapped up the hearings with closing remarks calling for new measures to ensure that an attack on the democratic process doesn’t happen again.

Laws are just words on paper

“We will recommend changes in laws and policies to guard against another Jan. 6,” said Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a member of the committee. But he warned, “Laws are just words on paper. They mean nothing without public servants dedicated to the rule of law.”

A supreme violation to the oath of office

“Whatever your politics, whatever you think about the outcome of the election, we as Americans must all agree on this: Donald Trump’s conduct on Jan. 6 was a supreme violation of his oath of office,” Kinzinger said.

The case against Trump is made by his own supporters

“The case against Donald Trump, in these hearings, is not made by witnesses who are his political enemies; it is instead a series of confessions by Trump’s own appointees, his own friends, his own campaign officials, people who worked for him for years and his own family,” said Rep. Liz Cheney, vice chair of the committee.

What’s next?

“The dam has begun to break,” said Cheney, and added that the panel would return in September because more people have come forward with new evidence concerning the insurrection.

After the panel returns in September

After the Jan. 6 committee returns in September with new evidence, it will be up to attorney general Merrick Garland in the Justice Department to review it and decide if the evidence presented is enough to file criminal charges against Donald Trump.

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