A perfect machine
Enough saliva to fill pools
Strong bones
A big heart
Full speed ahead
How we sneeze
Where do we have the most bones?
Left- and right-handed people
The brain as a computer
Neuronal velocity
Quantities of sulphur, carbon, potassium, fat and water
Cell renewal
Hiccup
The length of our blood vessels
Where does the heat go?
Shame in the stomach
Our sensation of thirst is very important
Fast sleep
How many lefties are there in the world?
Our hair
That's a lot of bacteria!
The strength of our jaws
Kisses heightening our pulse
The flipside of a kiss
Shedding the skin
Kissers
The strength of the tongue
The intestine
Breathing
Super-powerful eyes
Taste
We talk a lot!
Gravity changes your ears and nose
Hard-working eyes
Dying of sleep or dying of hunger?
Human fart
My head will go on
Eyelashes
Only 5 senses?
Strong fingers but no muscles
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A perfect machine

The human body is one of the coolest things the universe ever created. Click further to see some incredible facts about our body's potential.

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Enough saliva to fill pools

A human being produces about half a litre of saliva per day. Some even reach two litres daily. This amount accumulated over a lifetime would be enough to fill two Olympic swimming pools.

Photo: Joe Ciciarelli (Unsplash)

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Strong bones

A human bone is stronger than a steel bar of the same size and thickness. Still, it is possible to fracture it, as many of us have experienced.

Photo: Ian Dooley (Unsplash)

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A big heart

Throughout a life, the human heart pumps up to 182 million litres of blood.

Photo: Cerys Lowe (Unsplash)

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Full speed ahead

When we cough, we produce a current of air that passes through the airways at almost 100km/h.

 

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How we sneeze

We can try it hundreds of times, but we'll never be able to sneeze with our eyes open. Have you tried?

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Where do we have the most bones?

The human body has a total of 206 bones. Over a quarter of them are at the bottom: in the feet. Each foot has 26 bones: 7 tarsals, 5 metatarsals and 14 phalanges (three in each toe, except for the largest which has two).

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Left- and right-handed people

A right-handed person lives, on average, 9 years longer than a lefty. Is this a biological mystery or a statistical failure?

Photo: Kaleidico (Unsplash)

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The brain as a computer

The brain's storage capacity, if it were compared to a computer, would be 10 to 100 terabytes. Some scientists even assume this figure to be 2.5 petabytes or 2.5 million gigabytes. Hypertext Magazine calculated that this would be the equivalent of storing 3 million hours of videos.

Photo: Bret Kavanaugh (Unsplash)

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Neuronal velocity

A nerve impulse, once sent from the brain, travels through the body at a speed of 274km/h.

Photo: Josh Reimer (Unsplash)

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Quantities of sulphur, carbon, potassium, fat and water

The human body contains enough:

- Sulfur to kill all the fleas of a medium-sized dog

- Carbon to make a 900-pencil mine

- Potassium to fire a toy gun

- Fat to make 7 bars of soap

- Water to fill a 35 to 50 litre container

Photo: Frank Vessia (Unsplash)

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Cell renewal

While you're reading this sentence, 50,000 cells in your body died and were replaced by new ones.

Photo: Sincerely Media (Unsplash)

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Hiccup

Charles Osbourne was an ordinary American man, until he started hiccupping in 1922 and continued to do so until he died... in 1991! It was over 68 years of hiccups that made him famous but also very unhappy.

Photo: Clint McKoy (Unsplash)

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The length of our blood vessels

The accumulated length of the body's blood vessels is almost 100,000 kilometers.

Photo: Anastase Maragopoulos (Unsplash)

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Where does the heat go?

About 80% of the heat accumulated by the body ends up leaving it through the head.

Photo: Jurien Huggins (Unsplash)

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Shame in the stomach

When a person becomes embarrassed, not only does their face turn a darker red colour but also the stomach. That's because its internal walls suffer a sudden increase in blood flow.

Photo: Pamela Lima (Unsplash)

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Our sensation of thirst is very important

The sensation of thirst appears when the body loses the equivalent of 1% of its body weight. A loss of 5% represents a severe degree of dehydration and may cause fainting. If the decrease is greater than 10%, it could cause death.

Photo: Jacek Dylag (Unsplash)

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"Why is that? And why is that?"

A 4-year-old can ask up to 450 questions a day.

Photo: Tanaphong Toochinda (Unsplash)

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Fast sleep

A healthy person takes an average of 7 minutes to fall asleep. The U.S. National Sleep Foundation says that you may have problems getting rested if you take half an hour or more to fall asleep.

Photo: The Creative Exchange (Unsplash)

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How many lefties are there in the world?

According to a study by the National and Kapodistric University of Athens (Greece) and the University of St Andrews (United Kingdom), about 10.6% of the world's population is left-handed.

Photo: Kelly Sikkeman (Unsplash)

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Our hair

If all the hair on our body did not fall out or be cut during our entire lives, its total length could reach an average of 725km.

 

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That's a lot of bacteria!

The total weight of all the bacteria that a human being accumulates, is approximately 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds).

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The strength of our jaws

If the muscles of our jaws concentrated on a single point, they could exert a force of 77 kilograms per square centimetre. The fact that 99% of our calcium is concentrated in the teeth also helps.

Photo: Khamkhor (Unsplash)

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Kisses heightening our pulse

Our lips are 100 times more sensitive than our fingertips. What's more, a kiss received from a person we like can cause our pulse to increase 100 times per minute.

Photo: Constantinos Panagopoulos (Unsplash)

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The flipside of a kiss

The downside of kissing is that it causes you to exchange almost 300 different types of bacteria. Fortunately, 95% of them are not dangerous to your health.

Photo: Kinga Cichewicz (Unsplash)

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Shedding the skin

Over the course of a person's life, they can replace their skin up to a thousand times.

Photo: Florencia Viadana (Unsplash)

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Kissers

An average person spends two weeks over the course of life kissing others.

 

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The strength of the tongue

In proportion to its size, the tongue is the strongest muscle in the human body.

Photo: Hayes Potter (Unsplash)

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The intestine

A person's small intestine measures around 3.5 meters.

Photo: Seth Doyle (Unsplash)

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Breathing

In 24 hours, a person can inhale and exhale about 24,000 times.

Photo: Bianca Berg (Unsplash)

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Super-powerful eyes

Scientists estimate that the human eye is able to distinguish up to 100 colour variations that combine in up to 1 million colour tones.

Photo: Brook Cagle (Unsplash)

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Taste

From the age of 60, people lose many of their taste receptors. However, the sensation of what pleases the palate does not disappear.

Photo: Nuno Alberto (Unsplash)

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We talk a lot!

One person pronounces an average of 4,800 words in a day. That would be 200 words per hour, but if we discount the time we are asleep, this number goes up to about 300.

Photo: Ben White (Unsplash)

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Gravity changes your ears and nose

Our eyes are the same size as when we were born, but our nose and ears never stop growing. This behaviour happens due to their cartilaginous formation that deforms the body parts with the force of gravity.

Photo: Erik McLean (Unsplash)

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Hard-working eyes

The muscles of the eyes that allow us to focus on images move about 100,000 times a day. This effort would be the equivalent of walking 80km a day.

Photo: Eric Ward (Unsplash)

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Dying of sleep or dying of hunger?

If a person were deprived of both food and rest, they would die of sleep and not of hunger. Our organism survives up to 14 days without food, but it can't stand more than 10 days without sleep.

Photo: Abbie Bernet (Unsplash)

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Human fart

When we talk about toxic gases, we often forget that humans are also responsible for expelling them. A person releases an average of 14 farts a day, which means an average of 0.5 to 2 litres of gas.

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My head will go on

The scientific community considers it possible that the head of a decapitated person will continue to show signs of life for 20 seconds.

 

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Eyelashes

A person has about 250 lashes in each eye. The lifespan of these lashes is 4 months, so they grow much faster than the hair on the head.

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Only 5 senses?

The five main senses - smell, taste, sight, hearing and touch - have a number of ramifications. Among them are proprioception (perception of movement), thermoception (feeling changes in temperature) and synesthesia (ability to relate sounds, flavours and colours to each other).

Photo: Solstice Hannan (Unsplash)

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Strong fingers but no muscles

Fingers help us use our strength in everyday life, but they don't have muscles. They're composed of bones and tendons only.

Photo: Bady DQ (Unsplash)

Next: Why did scientist design a creature that is half ape, half human?

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