Extreme measures
From the surreal to the mundane
Who protects Putin?
Protection of senior officials and family members
Rosgvardia
About 400,000 troops
Soldiers with many functions
Four circles of protection
Plainclothes agents
Perimeter zones
Snipers
By land rather than by air
Travel is complicated
Back to the Middle Ages
The legend of the personal taster
Strict verification process for food
A toast? Yes, but with my bottle
Please leave your smartphone at the entrance
Internal line in the Kremlin
Did the CIA create the Internet?
Don't use Google?
Why use the internet when there is paper?
Isolated
Iron health?
Keep your distance
Away from your collaborators
Gone is the adventurous Putin
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Extreme measures

Putin always believes he is at risk, under threat, much like many other presidents. However, in the case of Putin, the measure he takes to protect himself from possible threats is quite extreme.

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From the surreal to the mundane

Among Putin's security measures, some border on being surreal. Others simply involve hundreds of people watching every move that Russia's undisputed leader takes. Join us for a look at Putin's security measures.

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Who protects Putin?

As specified by the BBC, the Russian president has the Russian Presidential Security Service as his personal surveillance network.

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Protection of senior officials and family members

The Presidential Security Service is integrated into the Russian Federal Protective Service (FSO), which derives from the former KGB, and which is also responsible for the protection of other high-ranking Kremlin officials.

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Rosgvardia

Putin also has the Rosgvardia, or Russian National Guard, considered (in a way) as the personal army of the president, which Putin himself created in 2016.

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About 400,000 troops

The director of this National Guard is General Viktor Zolotov (in the image), was Vladimir Putin's former body guard, and he is in charge of around 400,000 troops.

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Soldiers with many functions

This large number of soldiers is not only dedicated to the protection of the president but also to arms control, combating terrorism, organized crime, protecting public order and protecting important state facilities.

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Four circles of protection

When it comes to protecting Vladimir Putin, the security service is organized into four circles, according to the Russia Beyond website. The first is made up of hundreds of bodyguards. They are the closest to the Russian president and they are with him 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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Plainclothes agents

The second is made up of plainclothes agents who mix with the public and the citizens present wherever they go.

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Perimeter zones

A third circle is responsible for surrounding the public present and preventing any suspicious person from exceeding the security zone.

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Snipers

The fourth and final circle comprises snipers that surround the immediate area close to Vladimir Putin on the roofs of neighboring buildings.

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By land rather than by air

As security expert Mark Galeotti points out to the BBC, an additional security complication is that Vladimir Putin does not like to fly and insists on taking a massive caravan of motorcycles, black armored cars, and trucks with him when he travels.

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Travel is complicated

For these trips, says Mark Galeotti, the airspace is blocked, traffic is stopped, and extreme caution is exercised.

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Back to the Middle Ages

The matter takes on medieval overtones when we talk about the food that the Russian president eats.

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The legend of the personal taster

According to Mark Galeotti, Vladimir Putin has a personal food taster who tests everything the Russian leader is going to eat, to prevent it from being poisoned.

SEE ALSO: Countries that have nuclear weapons

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Strict verification process for food

In addition, before serving any food to the Russian president, his bodyguards must first verify that there are no suspicious elements in the preparation, according to what Stephan Hall, an expert on Russia, told the BBC.

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A toast? Yes, but with my bottle

Preventive measures do not stop there, because when he makes a trip, the Russian president brings his own food and drink. Even if there is a toast, Vladimir Putin pours himself a drink from his own bottle.

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Please leave your smartphone at the entrance

Communications are limited in the close environment of Vladimir Putin and smartphones are prohibited in the Kremlin.

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Internal line in the Kremlin

In an interview with the Russian news agency TASS, Vladimir Putin admitted this: only an official, internal line can be used to contact someone inside the Kremlin.

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Did the CIA create the Internet?

According to The Guardian, Putin distrusts the internet because he considers it "a CIA project".

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Don't use Google?

In fact, Vladimir Putin has called on Russians on several occasions to not use Google for their searches, considering that it is a tool of the United States to monitor the interests of the Russian population. Reason here (perhaps) is not lacking but monitoring is, rather, used for the commercial interests of the company that owns Google.

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Why use the internet when there is paper?

Instead of the network of networks, Vladimir Putin uses the traditional method: paper. “He starts his day with three security briefings. One is what’s going on in the world, one is what’s going on in Russia, and the third is what’s going on inside the elite. For him, this is the most important information and the one that will define his day," Mark Galeotti points out in his statements to the BBC.

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Isolated

Personally, the situation of the Russian president is one of almost monastic isolation. If the pandemic had limited access to the president to a few people, the attack on Ukraine has made even more difficult to meet with Putin.

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Iron health?

Indeed, Vladimir Putin's health is treated as a matter of national security. Anyone who wants to see him must undergo quarantine, a medical exam and several PCRs. Tell that to Emmanuele Macron, President of France, who refused to follow these guidelines and angered the Russian leader.

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Keep your distance

The famous photo of Macron at a table of unusual length was due to the Frenchman's refusal to take tests before speaking with Putin. However, the use of very long tables to maintain an exaggerated safety distance has been common since the pandemic broke out.

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Away from your collaborators

Even in a  meeting with such close associates Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, Putin keeps his distance. Some media have suggest that Covid 19 has isolated Putin and has placed him on the verge of paranoia.

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Gone is the adventurous Putin

The Putin who currently shields his existence against external threats seems very different from the one who, in other times, portrayed himself as a seasoned adventurer, riding, hunting or fishing in Siberia. Things certainly have changed.

Check out: Why Putin's allies are abandoning him

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