A definite end to the pandemic?
Immunity for one year (minimum) or even a lifetime
The bone marrow keeps a file to attack the coronavirus
Vaccines help
If this is true, how can we explain reinfections?
And the different mutations of COVID-19?
And what about the new wave of infections in the UK?
Vaccines are the only remedy
One more flu
How viruses usually operate
Viruses need people to stay alive
A pandemic of 2 years
News from Lombardy, epicentre of the worst of the first wave
Towards a world without a pandemic
Many unknowns remain
The triumph of science
Immune against COVID-19? Stay careful!
The war against the virus continues
Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(1/18)
A definite end to the pandemic?

It has not been easy to specify how long the immunity to COVID-19 lasts in persons who have had the disease or who were vaccinated. In fact, this question has been like all of those concerning the coronavirus: part of a new and unchartered territory. However, scientists are now carefully presenting some preliminary answers. And they are hopeful.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(2/18)
Immunity for one year (minimum) or even a lifetime

According to an article by immunologists from the University of Washington in the scholarly journal 'Nature,' people who were infected a year ago have preserved a cellular memory that continues to generate antibodies against COVID-19. And not only that: the scholars found indications that this defence capacity may be in our bodies for the long term.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(3/18)
The bone marrow keeps a file to attack the coronavirus

The 'Nature' article states that, although the antibodies may have disappeared from one's body, the bone marrow holds a kind of reservoir or memory to generate these antibodies again when the body detects a COVID-19 attack.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(4/18)
Vaccines help

This mechanism would not only occur in those who had been infected before, but also in people who got vaccinated. The vaccine can help create that function of self-defence and even strengthen it.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(5/18)
If this is true, how can we explain reinfections?

In general, not much is known about the topic of reinfections with COVID-19, but it is certain that the virus is still going around and that it could enter your body a second time. However, scholars say that, in case we have a mechanism to create our own defences (as they now seem to have discovered), a reinfection with COVID-19 will not cause serious effects.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(6/18)
And the different mutations of COVID-19?

There's also the question of the virus's mutations popping up in different parts of the world. Studies by Rockefeller University, among others, point out that people who had COVID-19 before and also got vaccinated have such a high level of antibodies (and for such a long time) that they can even fight the new and smarter variants of the coronavirus. They will at the very least tone down the variant's attack.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(7/18)
And what about the new wave of infections in the UK?

Despite all this, some data continue to worry scholars. The Indian variant is said to have caused a new wave of infections in the United Kingdom. Cases are increasing exponentially, even though the country is one of the most vaccinated in the world.  Some media suggest that the Indian variant is affecting most of all the people who have only received one of the two doses of the vaccine so far.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(8/18)
Vaccines are the only remedy

Scholars insist that vaccines can be the brake to the expansion of the pandemic. The World Health Organization ensures that vaccines work "against all variants of the coronavirus."

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(9/18)
One more flu

In fact, a number of scientists believe that if we achieve adequate herd immunity, COVID-19 will become simply another version of the flu with hardly any deaths in the future.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(10/18)
How viruses usually operate

After the initial panic, which was absolutely warranted considering the high numbers of casualties, scientists are now beginning to believe that this coronavirus is no different in its behaviour from other, similar microorganisms. Scholars now seem to observe that this is just another virus. A deadly one, yes, but still.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(11/18)
Viruses need people to stay alive

The logical thing for viruses is that, in order to survive themselves, they need to have the human species to live in. People are their favourite hosts and they 'want' people to coexist with them. For that reason, a complete extermination of the human race by a virus is unlikely.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(12/18)
A pandemic of 2 years

Scholars see similarities with other pandemics, such as the infamous "Spanish flu" which claimed thousands of lives. By 1920, the danger had basically disappeared. Or rather, the virus was still circulating but the population had managed to immunize itself against its effects.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(13/18)
News from Lombardy, epicentre of the worst of the first wave

Another hopeful fact: the medical authorities of Lombardy, Italy, who saw mass casualties in the first wave, say that they have not seen many reinfections in that region. It seems that whoever got COVID-19 in the first wave now has high levels of immunity.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(14/18)
Towards a world without a pandemic

Everything seems to indicate that, if the vaccination programs are executed properly, the pandemic may disappear. Of course, there could be the occasional spike, since viruses are not as predictable as we would like, but generally it will be over.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(15/18)
Many unknowns remain

However, many questions remain about COVID-19. We are talking about a new type of virus that emerged at the end of 2019 and that scientists have had to analyse at a dizzying speed.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(16/18)
The triumph of science

Considering the speed with which scholars have found new information about the virus and even created a vaccine in a very short period of time, their achievement should go into history as a milestone. Such advances in medical and biological science have never been made at this speed and with this level of success.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(17/18)
Immune against COVID-19? Stay careful!

Although it seems that we will be able to immunize ourselves against the dreaded COVID-19, it is still advisable to act with caution. Keep everything clean, go to the doctor at the slightest suspicion of an infection, and do everything to protect the elderly from contact with the virus.

Good news about COVID-19: immunity said to last a lifetime
(18/18)
The war against the virus continues

The battle is not yet won and in some parts of the world (Brazil, Argentina, India, Bangladesh…) it continues to be a fierce war with many victims. The fight persists with science as the main weapon.

 

ALSO: The hypothesis resurfaces that COVID-19 came from a laboratory

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