Chinese government desperate to boost declining birth rates

By 2025 China's population could be in decline
Fifth year in a row birth rates have fallen in China
An all time low
Government data shows lowest birth rates in decades
Lowest rate in Hunan province in 60 years
Only one province had 1 million babies born in 2021
Birth rates will continue to fall
The Chinese government is desperate to improve the birth rate
Women are now allowed to have up to 3 children
The city of Panzhihua offers a baby bonus
Attempts to fight the demographic decline
From being fined for having babies to being paid to have more
Why don't young Chinese couples want more children?
Start a family is not a priority
Chinese women want gender equality and job security
No benefits for single mothers
Majority of Chinese live in urban areas
City life is expensive
Young couples aren't convinced by propaganda promoting larger families
China's large working age population the key to its economic rise
China became the
More old than young in China by the 2030s?
Some say China is not facing a crisis
Nothing to worry about?
By 2025 China's population could be in decline

For the longest time, China has been known as one of the countries with the highest population in the world. However, this could change, and possibly as soon as 2025.

Fifth year in a row birth rates have fallen in China

According to 2021 statistics from the Chinese government, birth rates have fallen for the fifth consecutive year.

An all time low

A record low of just 7.52 birth per 1000 people, making the number of children a person will have in their lifetime one of the lowest in the world at 1.15.

Government data shows lowest birth rates in decades

The government released birth data for 2021 on July 24, showing the lowest birth rates in the country in decades.

Lowest rate in Hunan province in 60 years

According to the Global Times, births fell below 500,000 in the southern province of Hunan for the first time in sixty years.

Only one province had 1 million babies born in 2021

In addition, only one province, Guangdong, had more than one million new babies in 2021.

Birth rates will continue to fall

Global Times reported that Yang Wenzhuang, the head of population and family affairs at the National Health Commission, said things won't be getting better any time soon.

"expected to enter a negative growth"

Wenzhuang said, "The growth rate of China's total population has slowed significantly and is expected to enter a negative growth during the 14th Five-Year Plan period (2021-25)."

The Chinese government is desperate to improve the birth rate

Simply put, China's population is decreasing and expected to shrink in the following years. And the Chinese government is not happy about it.

Women are now allowed to have up to 3 children

In an attempt to boost birth rates, in May 2021, the Chinese government passed a law allowing women to have up to three children, along with reducing childbirth and education costs.

The city of Panzhihua offers a baby bonus

The Global Times reported that the city of Panzhihua announced in July of 2021 that couples who had more than one child would receive a monetary baby bonus of sorts.

Attempts to fight the demographic decline

This was the first time an incentive of this kind was offered in China. The Chinese government seems desperate to combat China's demographic decline.

From being fined for having babies to being paid to have more

Chinese citizens must find the idea of receiving money for having children odd, given that from 1980 -2016, parents were fined if they had more than one child.

Why don't young Chinese couples want more children?

Science Magazine spoke to Yong Cai, a demographer at the University of North Carolina, about why young couples choose not to have more children.

Start a family is not a priority

Cai told Science that few young couples "put starting a family, or having another child, as their biggest priority."

Chinese women want gender equality and job security

Many Chinese women say that the changes are too little too late and that they lack gender equality and job security.

No benefits for single mothers

In addition, The New York Times reports that many women are angry that the benefits given for having children only apply if they are married, single mothers cannot apply for them.

Majority of Chinese live in urban areas

The statistics from the Chinese government also show that almost 65% of the population now live in urban areas, which is another factor that influences the number of children couples are willing to have.

City life is expensive

Demographer Wei Ggo from Nanjing University told Science that the conditions of city living: the high cost of living, expensive schools, and crowded living conditions "reduce people's willingness to have a second child, let alone a third child."

Young couples aren't convinced by propaganda promoting larger families

Yong Cai told Science that "despite all the new initiatives and propaganda to promote childbearing," couples simply are against having more children. Cai predicts that "China's population decline will be rapid."

China's large working age population the key to its economic rise

China's working-age population (those between 15-64 years of age) of almost one billion has been the key to the country's economic rise.

China became the "workshop of the world"

A massive working age population is how China essentially became "the workshop of the world," as reported by Bloomberg.

More old than young in China by the 2030s?

However, as the country ages, and if population projections by the United Nations are to be believed, by the 2030s, China's economic situation may look quite different.

Some say China is not facing a crisis

Nonetheless, not all demographers agree that China faces a looming demographic crisis. Stuart Gietel-Basten from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology is one of them.

Nothing to worry about?

Gietel-Basten told Science Magazine, "... China's population is also getting healthier, better educated and skilled, and more adaptable to technology."

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