Vaccines that have saved humanity throughout history

Instrument that saves lives
Vaccines to live
Vaccines reduce mortality
Vaccines are still not available for everyone
Risks of epidemics
Measles cases on the rise
Diseases that can be prevented with vaccines
Factors preventing access to vaccines
False myths about the importance of vaccines
Vaccines do not cause autism
Vaccines are safe
Vaccines go through several tests
Post-marketing stage
Vaccines also pass WHO approval
Vaccines are an investment
Immunization reduces treatment costs
Eradication of polio
Eradication of polio
New vaccines will emerge
Instrument that saves lives

People around the world have been anxiously awaiting the end of the Covid-19 pandemic. Although contagions are still many, the return to almost normal life is already possible, thanks to the various vaccines created to fight the coronavirus. In fact, throughout history, we have been free from several diseases due to the high rate of immunization through this type of medicine. See in the gallery!

Vaccines to live

"With the exception of clean water, no other factor, not even antibiotics, has had such an important effect in reducing mortality." This is how the World Health Organization opens this report on immunization through vaccines.

Photo: Pixabay / @moritz320

Vaccines reduce mortality

Vaccines prevent more than 2.5 million child deaths each year. Pneumonia and diarrhea are the main causes of infant mortality. Fortunately, pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines are increasingly enabling a change in this scenario.

Photo: Unsplash / @cdc

Vaccines are still not available for everyone

More than 100 million children are vaccinated each year, according to the WHO, and this opportunity to grow up healthy is indisputable for everyone's future. However, the goal is still to reach 24 million children who live in poor or conflict-affected countries where access to vaccines is still precarious.

Photo: Pixabay / Spencer Davis

Risks of epidemics

The fact that immunization does not reach at least 95% of humanity, including people who were not vaccinated in the past, causes outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles, which reappear even in countries where vaccination coverage is high.

Measles cases on the rise

In the first half of 2022, 79% more measle cases were reported worldwide compared to the same period in 2021 according to WHO. However, the organization estimates that this number is much higher, as less than 1 in 10 cases are reported.

Photo: Unsplash / @cdc

Diseases that can be prevented with vaccines

In addition to measles, there are more than 26 vaccine-preventable diseases, many of them lethal and disabling, such as diphtheria, hepatitis, meningitis and polio.

Factors preventing access to vaccines

Weakness in the health system, lack of infrastructure and funding, in addition to the lack of knowledge about the importance of vaccines are the main factors that hold back the advance of global immunization.

False myths about the importance of vaccines

According to the WHO, the reluctance to vaccinate, which has gained strength in recent years, is a serious threat to global health. Neither quality sanitation enough to prevent the diseases that vaccines prevent, nor is immunization from naturally contracting the disease safe.

Vaccines do not cause autism

A fraudulent article, written in 1988, and later withdrawn by the magazine that published it, linked, without evidence, the MMR vaccine with autism. Not only the WHO but the entire reputable medical community in the world condemned the accusation. Currently, internet giants such as Facebook and Google are scrambling to eliminate any false information about vaccines.

Vaccines are safe

Vaccines produce an immune response in the body without the risk of causing disease and its serious complications. Still in the laboratory, its components are subjected to tests to determine aspects such as purity and potency.

Vaccines go through several tests

After the component analysis phase in the laboratory, a clinical trial of safety and efficacy in human beings is carried out.

Post-marketing stage

Once authorized, batches of vaccines are submitted to post-marketing tests to verify the uniformity of the production process and monitor any possible adverse effects.

Photo: Unsplash / Mat Napo

Vaccines also pass WHO approval

In addition to regulatory systems in each country, WHO also provides vaccine prequalification initiatives.

Photo: Unsplash / Hush Naidoo Jade Photography

Vaccines are an investment

Efficient vaccination coverage represents an important investment for nations. However, it allows you to save a much greater value in treatments.

Immunization reduces treatment costs

One example of cost-effectiveness is the worldwide eradication of smallpox. The US $100 million that were spent on vaccines over 10 years, until 1977, saved US $1.3 billion in treatment and prevention.

Eradication of polio

The polio vaccine, developed in the 1950s by Dr. Jonas Salk (pictured), when the disease was common in several countries, is another example of effectiveness.

Eradication of polio

Supported by a worldwide WHO campaign, immunization against polio has reduced its appearance by 99%.

New vaccines will emerge

Since 1923, when the first vaccine to prevent Diphtheria was manufactured, much progress has been made in the industry dedicated to the field. The WHO is betting that the world is moving towards developing vaccines against AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, as well as others adapted to specific needs.

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