Made in Canada eh?! Canadian inventions to be proud of

So many useful things invented by Canadians!
Basketball
James Naismith invented basketball
The snowmobile
Joseph Bombardier built the first successful snowmobile
The paint roller
The Canadian inventor died before getting the patent
The garbage bag
Hansen sold his invention and 'Glad bags' were born
Road lines
The first road lines in the world were painted in Canada
The pacemaker
John Hopps invented the first subcutaneous pacemaker
The electric wheelchair
George Klein also invented aircraft skis
Walkie-talkie
Hings invention was of great value in WWII
IMAX
The first IMAX movie ever was screened at Expo'70
So many useful things invented by Canadians!

Canadians are known to be resourceful and inventive. When you see this list of items, you might be surprised just how many everyday things we take for granted were created by Canadians!

Basketball

If you grew up in Canada in the 90s, you probably already know about this one! Remember the 'Canadian Heritage Minute' spots on public TV? They informed us Canadian kids all about the marvellous Canadian inventions, including basketball.

James Naismith invented basketball

Canadian James Naismith invented basketball; however, he invented the game while working as a P.E instructor in Massachusetts in 1891.

The snowmobile

Of course, the snowmobile was invented in Canada! When you live with so many months of snow, it isn't surprising! The invention of the snowmobile began with the patent of the Vehicle Propeller by Harold J. Kalenze in Manitoba in 1911.

Joseph Bombardier built the first successful snowmobile

In 1935 Joseph Bombardier developed something closer to what we know as snowmobiles today. Bombardier built the first successful snowmobile, with a sprocket wheel, drive track system steered by skis.

(Photo: By Melensdad at English Wikipedia)

The paint roller

If you've ever seen the "paint-roller" segment by Canada's favourite handyman Red-Green, then you know that it is a 100% Canadian invention. The world owes the invention of the ever-useful paint roller to Canadian Norman Breakey.

The Canadian inventor died before getting the patent

Breakey invented the paint roller in Toronto in 1940. However, he died before getting a chance to patent his invention.
American Richard Croxton Adams was the first to patent the paint roller design and profit from it.

The garbage bag

Before the invention of the modern garbage bag, taking out the trash wasn't a pleasant task. Luckily for the world, in 1950, Larry Hansen invented the green polyethylene garbage bag.

Hansen sold his invention and 'Glad bags' were born

Hansen's invention was bought by Union Carbide, who produced and sold the bags under the name 'Glad.' Well, we sure are "glad" this invention was created!

Road lines

It is hard to imagine driving without road lines! There must have been so many traffic accidents! Luckily for us, in 1930, a Canadian transport engineer had an epiphany and came up with the idea.

The first road lines in the world were painted in Canada

John D. Millar worked for the Ontario department of transportation and invented the concept of road lines. Thanks to Millar the first road lines in the world were painted on a highway between Ontario and Quebec in 1930.

The pacemaker

Many people across the globe depend on pacemakers to keep their hearts ticking. In 1949 John Hopps, a Canadian engineer, developed the first subcutaneous pacemaker.

John Hopps invented the first subcutaneous pacemaker

John Hopps based his invention on observations made by Wilfred Bigelow and John Callaghan, cardiac surgeons in Toronto. Following further investigations and collaboration with other inventors, the first implantable pacemaker was put to use in 1958 on an 86 year old Swedish man.

The electric wheelchair

In 1953 George Klein invented the first electric wheelchair. An invention that has enabled a higher degree of autonomy for many, which they otherwise would be denied if they only had access to a manual wheelchair.

(Photo: National Research Council of Canada)

George Klein also invented aircraft skis

George Klein, an Ontario-born inventor, was employed at the National Research Council, where he created many valuable inventions. We can thank Klein not only for the electric wheelchair but also for aircraft skis, the microsurgical staple gun, and the M29 Weasel army snowmobile, among many others.

Walkie-talkie

Canadian inventor Donald Lewes Hings invented a portable radio signaling system in 1937. Created for his employer CM&S, Hings dubbed it a "packset," but it later became known as the walkie-talkie.

(Photo: By LuckyLouie (talk) 12:23, 18 July 2008 (UTC) - scan of antique manual)

Hings invention was of great value in WWII

Over the years, Hings developed various models of walkie-talkies, such as the C-58 Walkie-Talkie used by infantry during World War Two.

IMAX

Three Canadian filmmakers are credited with the development of IMAX. Graeme Ferguson, Roman Kroiter, and Robert Kerr were asked to produce large-screen films for the 1967 Expo. The trio realized they needed different equipment to fulfil this request.

(Photo: By NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

The first IMAX movie ever was screened at Expo'70

Japan asked the trio to produce a film for Expo'70, so they created the Multiscreen Corporation. William Shaw was recruited to assist the group in inventing the cameras they needed to film in image maximum or what now call IMAX. The first-ever IMAX movie was screened at Expo'70, and it was titled 'Tiger Child.'

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