Brexit: 12 cultural differences between Britons and continental Europeans

English humor
English breakfast
Carpets everywhere
Pay TV
Afternoon Tea
Ginger beer
The British Pound
The most photographed royal family in the world
Fish and chips
Mr Blobby
They drive on the left side.
Gallons
English humor

In English humor, few subjects are taboo. Moreover, insinuations, intellectual jokes, and word games characterize British humor, so you'd better pay attention and understand them if you don't want to look like a dummy. Monty Python are the masters of British humor but there are many, many more.

English breakfast

The English breakfast is a feast of food that usually includes bacon, eggs, sausages, potatoes, blood sausages, beans, ham ... If you find it bland, don't forget to use ketchup or HP sauce (brown sauce). And if you still have room for a sweet touch, remember the muffins.

Carpets everywhere

They're all over the house. Their origin lies in the cold climate and the need for insulation against noises between different flats in a building. It's not unusual in the UK to expect that carpets are included with the house just like doors and windows. Other European nationalities tend to be less attached to their carpets.

Pay TV

Anyone who installs a television at home must pay a license. This goes for both natives and foreigners in temporary residence. Many other European countries have abandoned this TV contribution, but in the UK, the annual fee still serves to pay the expenses for the public television network. If you don't pay it, you get a fine!

Afternoon Tea

Few British people can do without the tea tradition. It takes place between 3 and 5 pm and is usually accompanied by pastries or, for the less gluttonous, by cucumber sandwiches. Did you know that to go to the 'Afternoon Tea' of London's big hotels, such as the Ritz, you need elegant clothing, make a reservation in advance, and pay 40 British pounds?

Ginger beer

Yeah, you read it right, ginger beer. Ginger, lemon, sugar, water and brewer's yeast. Would you dare try it?

The British Pound

The pound (GBP) is the official currency of the United Kingdom. It is the world's oldest currency that is still in use. It's value fluctuates, especially with insecurity surrounding Brexit, but it generally costs more than a US dollar or a euro. For Europeans, vacationing in the UK tends to be expensive.

The most photographed royal family in the world

It is common to find a photo of Queen Elizabeth II in British homes, either stuck as a magnet to the refrigerator, engraved on a key ring, or framed in the living room. Society does not tend to question the monarchy, and that is remarkable. Who nowadays remains so stable on the throne for more than 66 years and is sovereign of sixteen independent states?

Fish and chips

It's the typical fried dish for the British. London's first fish and chips restaurant dates back to 1860, but it was already a known dish before that, Dickens's novel Oliver Twist, for example, refers repeatedly to this culinary combination. Fish and chips is also the most common take-out food. It's rare to stroll through any city in the country and not encounter the famous chip shops.

Mr Blobby

Pink with yellow spots, bulging eyes, and a permanent toothy smile. This is the doll that has appeared in the BBC series Noel's House Party since 1992. Its childish attitude is aimed at irritating guests, although its only way of communicating is with the word 'blobby.'

They drive on the left side.

When a European travels to the UK, traffic is a shocker. Cars drive on the left side, while the rest of Europe keeps its traffic on the right side. The British are very considerate, though, and have painted the phrase "Look right" on the asphalt at every crossing. The discrepancy in traffic in the UK can be explained by three things: one, medieval tournaments, where competitors kept to the right of their rivals; two, a differentiation between classes, as nobility and knights used the left lane while the lower classes had to stay on the right, and three, the fact that riders used their right hands to whip their horses.

Gallons

Europeans count in liters, but Anglosaxon countries use the gallon as their unit of volume. It's also called the imperial gallon. 1 gallon is equivalent to 4.54609 liters.

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