Australian beaches, 100 years ago

Bondi Beach, NSW (circa 1900)
Coogee Beach, NSW (circa 1900)
St Kilda Beach, Victoria (circa 1900)
Bondi Aquarium at Tamarama Beach, NSW (circa 1900)
Wonderland City at Tamarama Beach (circa 1900)
The Esplanade, Coogee Beach, NSW  (circa 1900)
South Beach, Fremantle, WA  (cira 1900s)
Coogee Beach, NSW (circa 1905)
 Beach at Cowes,  Phillip Island, Victoria (circa 1910)
Maroubra Beach, NSW (circa 1910)
Broadbeach, QLD (1932)
Newcastle Beach, NSW (circa 1930)
Bondi Beach, NSW (circa 1930s)
Glenelg Beach, SA (1911)
Austinmer Beach, NSW (1917)
Acrobatics on Palm Beach, NSW (circa 1920s)
Manly Beach, NSW (circa 1930)
Henley Beach, SA (1923)
Clovelly Beach, NSW (circa 1930s)
Bondi Beach, NSW (circa 1925)
Beach at Wynnum, QLD (circa 1920s)
Cronulla Beach, NSW (circa 1930s)
Mooroochydore, QLD (1930)
Bondi Beach, NSW (circa 1900)

Throughout the years Australian’s have flocked to the beach to find relief from the heat of summer. Australia’s most famous beach, Bondi is said to be named after the local aboriginal word 'boondi' meaning 'water breaking over rocks'.

Coogee Beach, NSW (circa 1900)

Coogee Beach in Sydney’s east has long been popular for its safe swimming conditions. The Coogee Aquarium seen in the background here was officially opened in 1887.

St Kilda Beach, Victoria (circa 1900)

St Kilda Beach is perhaps Victoria’s most famous beach. It is perched on the northeastern shoreline of Melbourne’s Port Phillip Bay.

Bondi Aquarium at Tamarama Beach, NSW (circa 1900)

Tamarama Beach was once home to Sydney's first coastal amusement park, the Bondi Aquarium. In the summertime, the aquarium drew large crowds who flocked to see the seals and sharks, as well as ride the famous beach rollercoaster.

Wonderland City at Tamarama Beach (circa 1900)

In 1906 the Bondi Aquarium at Tamarama Beach reopened as “Wonderland City”. The newly rejuvenated amusement park was powered by its own steam plant.

The Esplanade, Coogee Beach, NSW (circa 1900)

Despite its popularity, Coogee Beach is said to be named after the local Aboriginal word ‘koojah’ meaning ‘smelly place’, likely thanks to the smell of rotting seaweed.

South Beach, Fremantle, WA (cira 1900s)

In times past, a day at the beach could include some unusual sights by today's standards. In this colourized postcard of South Beach in Fremantle, a horse and donkey can be seen amongst the hats and parasols of the crowd.

Coogee Beach, NSW (circa 1905)

Coogee Beach was finally connected to Sydney city by tram in 1902. If you look carefully you can see the newly opened tram line here in the bottom left.

Beach at Cowes, Phillip Island, Victoria (circa 1910)

The town of Cowes on Phillip Island has long been a popular holiday beach destination for Victorians.

Maroubra Beach, NSW (circa 1910)

Maroubra is said to be named after a local Aboriginal word meaning ‘place of thunder’.

Broadbeach, QLD (1932)

Broadbeach was a popular beach destination well before the highrises appeared on the Gold Coast.

Newcastle Beach, NSW (circa 1930)

Crowded beach umbrellas and Peter’s ice cream - not much has changed on Newcastle Beach in the last 100 years!

Bondi Beach, NSW (circa 1930s)

Despite becoming a public beach in 1882, it wasn't until regular bus services started in the 1930s that Bondi Beach was truly accessible to Sydney locals.

Glenelg Beach, SA (1911)

For well over 100 years South Australian’s have flocked to the shore at Adelaide’s Glenelg Beach in the summer.

Austinmer Beach, NSW (1917)

Much like today, beachgoers had to bring their own shade to battle the heat of the summer sun.

Acrobatics on Palm Beach, NSW (circa 1920s)

Not just for swimming, Aussie beaches were filled with all sorts of entertainment.

Manly Beach, NSW (circa 1930)

Even now Manly Beach remains one of the most popular of Sydney’s Northern Beaches.

Henley Beach, SA (1923)

Cooling off in the surf at Henley Beach in South Australia.

Clovelly Beach, NSW (circa 1930s)

Clovelly Beach is home to the Clovelly Surf Life Saving Club. Founded in 1906 it was one the world's first surf lifesaving clubs.

Bondi Beach, NSW (circa 1925)

Bondi Beach is only about 1 kilometre long and welcomes approximately 2.5million beachgoers every year.

Beach at Wynnum, QLD (circa 1920s)

The beachside suburb of Wynnum was a popular swimming spot for Brisbane locals.

Cronulla Beach, NSW (circa 1930s)

Summertime in Cronulla has always drawn big crowds.

Mooroochydore, QLD (1930)

It seems there has always been fun in the sun on the Sunshine Coast.

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